Thursday, January 31, 2008

Below are installation shots of Collectors Select at Arlington Arts Center. The reception for the show is tomorrow night--Friday, February 1, from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. A 44 page catalogue designed by Lisa McCarty, featuring essays from all of the collectors and images of works by their selected artists, will be available for purchase at the reception.

This is the first show at the AAC that I've shepherded along from start to finish--think of it as my coming out party as the AAC's new curator.

With this show we really wanted to challenge people's assumptions about what a community arts center is and can do.

Personally, I wanted to take advantage of one of the AAC's key assets: Space. Strictly from a standpoint of exhibition design, I wanted to create a show in which each and every one of our nine, roughly 800-square foot galleries projects a level of fit and finish appropriate to a single, self-contained commercial gallery. Not an easy goal to accomplish with a staff of five people, and a crew of dedicated but overworked volunteers...but I think the results will really surprise gallery-goers.




View from the front door.



Julian Fore's gallery; left side. From left to right: William Christenberry, Janis Goodman, John Dreyfuss.



Right side, Julian's space: Dreyfuss, Sam Gilliam, Jeffrey Smith.



Sam Gilliam's Blue Slat, courtesy of Julian's collection.



In Heather and Tony Podesta's gallery: Barbara Liotta's site specific sculpture, Ascent I. Constructed with chunks of green marble and lift cord; roughly 17' X 10' X 8'.



Steve Alterman's landscape photos; Barbara Liotta.



Another view of the Liotta piece.



Kathryn Cornelius glimpsed through the Liotta.



Hidden World photos by Kathryn.



View of Daniel Levinas's room, featuring heliographs by Leon Ferrari. These are essentialy unlimited edition mail art pieces; they arrive folded up inside an envelope; one simply unfolds them and pins them to the wall.

Yes, we did paint this entire 30' X 60' room a dark shade of raspberry. Down with white cube aesthetics!



Closeup of vitrine with signed Ferrari prints.



Another view of the Levinas/Ferrari room.



Philippa Hughes filled our Tiffany gallery with graffiti, courtesy of Tim Conlon, Bryan Conner, the SOVIET, and RAMS.



The other side of the Tiffany gallery.



Miniature graffiti for model trains.



Closeup of one of the pieces. The artists mounted blank canvases on the walls before they started working--which not only activates the surface, but also allows fragments of each piece to be sold.



View of Henry L. Thaggert's room, featuring four videos by McCallum and Tarry.



The other side of Henry's room.



Closeup of Topsy Turvy video--with late 19th/early 20th century tospy-turvy dolls installed above.



Philip Barlow's gallery. Shown here: Simon Gouverneur, Wayne Edson Bryan, Tomas Rivas.



Three meticulously, obsessively crafted pieces by Wayne Edson Bryan, hanging against a wall graphic painted by the artist himself. Wayne is in self-imposed semi-retirement--his pieces require so much time to execute that he's unwilling to paint if he can't devote around 12 hours a day to working. Maybe this show will draw him out into our midst again.



Closeup of one of Tomas Rivas's carved drywall pieces.



Two pieces by Michele Kong. I hadn't seen many of Kong's drawings or paintings before this show. Beautifully done.



Closeup of a small piece by Kong.

Also on view, but not pictured: An excellent group show for our resident artists up on the third floor, featuring our two newest residents, and a show of the print portfolio by the international artists' collective, Take Me to the River, in our community space, including prints by Maggie Michael, Billy Colbert, and a whole bunch of other follks. That, my friend, is a full evening of art.

1 Comments:

Blogger Andrea said...

coming out party! can't wait to see you in the tiara and white cotillion gown.

looks great, Jeffry. I look forward to seeing it tomorrow.

andrea

5:57 PM  

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